1) National Doctor’s Day

National Doctors’ Day is celebrated on 01 July every year in INDIA for the past 32 years (since 1991), honouring the legendary and renowned doctor Bidhan Chandra Roy, a politician, a freedom fighter, and an advocate for education.

Doctors are the soldiers of the country, those who don’t fight at borders but dedicatedly work to save lives and improve life expectancy while putting their lives at risk. Their contribution towards human health is beyond expectations. They are always the first to respond to a pandemic situation such as COVID-19, Disease X, Plague, Flu, AIDS, Ebola, and others to protect the general populace.

National Doctor’s Day 2024 Theme

This year 2024, the National Doctors Day theme is “Healing Hands, Caring Hearts. The theme emphasises the dedication and compassion doctors bring to their practice daily and the critical role they play in saving lakhs of lives throughout their lifetime.

Year by year, the themes for National Doctor’s Day

  • National Doctor’s Day theme 2023: Celebrating Resilience and Healing Hands
  • National Doctor’s Day theme 2022: Family Doctors on the Front Line
  • National Doctor’s Day theme 2019: Zero tolerance to violence against doctors and clinical establishment

Importance and Role of Doctors

Doctors have a vital role in society; they devote their lives to patients’ well-being, assisting in faster recovery from disease or condition and improving their quality of life. They greatly understand medical science and commit their knowledge to treating patients’ medical conditions and extending life expectancy.

In many incidents where doctors have never given up despite being attacked by patients and their relatives. Continued their medical services for the general population. No one can forget their contributions and tireless efforts.

Significance of National Doctors’ Day 

National Doctors’ Day has been celebrated in INDIA to recognize and appreciate the importance of the doctors’ roles in society. This also helps the general population to know the importance, significant roles and responsibilities delivered towards the patient’s care by doctors.

On this special day, every Indian should feel proud of having skilled medical experts who dedicate their lives to improving their country’s health and be grateful for their efforts and contributions during medical emergencies.

2) World Chocolate Day

WORLD CHOCOLATE DAY

Every year on July 7th, World Chocolate Day allows chocolate lovers around the world to indulge in their favorite treat without any guilt. The day also celebrates all kinds of goodies made from chocolate, including chocolate milk, hot chocolate, chocolate candy bar, chocolate cake, brownies, or anything covered in chocolate.

WORLD CHOCOLATE DAY

Every year on July 7th, World Chocolate Day allows chocolate lovers around the world to indulge in their favorite treat without any guilt. The day also celebrates all kinds of goodies made from chocolate, including chocolate milk, hot chocolate, chocolate candy bar, chocolate cake, brownies, or anything covered in chocolate.

Most people love chocolate. In fact, nine out of ten people love chocolate. About 1 billion people eat chocolate every day. Besides the fact it tastes so good, there are some health benefits of chocolate. Chocolate increases serotonin and dopamine levels, which helps to boost the mood. Dark chocolate can also be especially good for you. Dark chocolate is a powerful source of antioxidants, plus it helps to improve blood flow, lower blood pressure, and reduce the risk of heart disease

3) World Population Day

World Population Day, marked annually on 11 July, seeks to focus attention on the urgency and importance of population issues. It was established by the then-Governing Council of the United Nations Development Programme in 1989, and was first marked on 11 July 1990 in more than 90 countries.

The World Health Organization (WHO) plays a critical role in addressing various aspects of population health globally, including reproductive health, non-communicable diseases, health equity, women’s health and more. In our South-East Asia region, the WHO’s initiatives are particularly significant due to the diverse health challenges faced by the population.

As the Secretary General of the United Nations, Antonio Guterres, reminds us, “It is outrageous that well into the 21st century, around 800 women die needlessly every day in pregnancy and childbirth – the vast majority in developing countries. And in some places, legislative advances in tackling vital issues such as female genital mutilation risk going into reverse.”

Women form the backbone of societies by nurturing families, driving economies, and shaping the future. By empowering women with access to education, healthcare, and economic resources, we pave the way for a brighter future for all. Reproductive health and rights stand as the foundation of women’s empowerment. Access to comprehensive reproductive health services safeguards individual health and contributes to broader societal well-being. When women can make informed choices about their bodies and reproduction, they are better positioned to pursue education, careers, and fulfill their aspirations. Empowering the health and wellbeing of women is a strategic imperative for sustainable development, and a matter of morality. By investing in women’s health, from the girl child to the elderly, we invest in the prosperity of nations. 

The wellbeing of our children reflects the society we have built and the values we uphold. Each child deserves a childhood free from fear, abuse, and neglect. Violence against children knows no borders, affecting urban and rural areas alike, and cutting across socio-economic divides. Preventing violence against children, especially girls, is an urgent call towards a safer and more equitable world. WHO efforts to promote the prevention of violence include health sector responsiveness to recognize the causes of injuries, protection of victims of domestic violence, as well as ensuring that schools and communities are safe places to grow, live, and learn.

A safe environment, in communities, schools, and urban spaces for children, especially the girl child, are important enabling factors for children to engage in physical activities. By promoting safe spaces and ensuring access to healthcare, we can empower our youth to lead healthy and fulfilling lives. We should prioritize creating safe and healthy urban spaces that promote physical activities and foster a sense of community.

On World Population Day 2024, allow me to reiterate that one of my five Strategic Priority areas deals specifically with improving the health of women and children.

Those who traditionally suffer from health inequality, such as girls and women, adolescents and vulnerable populations, are the drivers of sustainable development, and powerful agents of change. Strategic investments in the health of women and girls yield multiplicative and multigenerational benefits beyond health.

Meanwhile investments in adolescent health are essential for promoting healthy socio-economic development, and preventing health risks and problems before their onset. This supports the wellbeing of the youth of today – who are the human capital of tomorrow.

This World Population Day, let us remind ourselves of the task ahead, and recommit to achieving health equity for vulnerable populations, including women, children, the elderly, and marginalized communities through a participatory approach addressing health determinants. 

4) World Youth Skills Day

2024 Theme: Youth Skills for Peace and Development

In 2014, the United Nations General Assembly declared 15 July as World Youth Skills Day, to celebrate the strategic importance of equipping young people with skills for employment, decent work and entrepreneurship.

The theme for World Youth Skills Day 2024, “Youth Skills for Peace and Development,” underscores the crucial role young people play in peacebuilding and conflict resolution.

The world faces a multitude of challenges today, many of which affect the youth. Violent conflicts disrupting education and stability, a polarized online environment fostering negativity, and persistent economic inequality limits opportunities. These issues threaten not only individual futures but also the overall stability of societies. It is crucial to equip youth with the necessary skills for fostering a culture of peace, nurturing responsible global citizens, and promoting sustainable development to build a more just, inclusive, and sustainable future for all.

On World Youth Skills Day, let us unite in recognizing the potential of young people as agents of peace and commit to providing them with the skills and opportunities to address challenges and contribute to a peaceful, prosperous, and sustainable future.

5) National Flag Day

National Flag Day 2024: The Tricolour’s History And Significance

National Flag Day is not only a day to honour the flag but also an opportunity to reflect on the values and sacrifices associated with India’s freedom struggle.

India’s National Flag Day commemorates the adoption of the Indian national flag on July 22, 1947, by the Constituent Assembly, a few days before the country attained Independence from the British on August 15, 1947. This day is significant as it honours the symbol of India’s unity, integrity and sovereignty, according to government website Know India.

National Flag Day 2024: The Tricolour's History And Significance

The use of the Tricolour is governed by the Flag Code of India.

India’s National Flag Day commemorates the adoption of the Indian national flag on July 22, 1947, by the Constituent Assembly, a few days before the country attained Independence from the British on August 15, 1947. This day is significant as it honours the symbol of India’s unity, integrity and sovereignty, according to government website Know India.

Design and symbolism of the flag

The Indian national flag, known as the “Tiranga”, features three horizontal stripes of equal width. The top stripe is saffron (kesaria), representing courage and sacrifice. The middle stripe is white, symbolising peace and truth, with a navy blue Ashoka Chakra (wheel) at its centre, which signifies the eternal wheel of law. The bottom stripe is green, denoting growth and auspiciousness. The flag’s proportions are in the ratio of 2:3 and the Ashoka Chakra has 24 spokes, representing continuous progress.

Historical context

The flag’s design, adopted just weeks before India’s Independence, was chosen to replace the earlier version. The Ashoka Chakra replaced the spinning wheel, or “Charkha,” which was a symbol of self-reliance and resistance during the freedom struggle. This change was suggested by Badr-ud-Din Tyabji and endorsed by Mahatma Gandhi.

The Flag Code of India

The Flag Code of India was modified in 2002, allowing citizens to display and use of the national flag on any day and not just National days as was the case earlier, but with respect and dignity. Citizens are permitted to fly the flag throughout the year, provided they adhere to the guidelines, which include hoisting the flag between sunrise and sunset unless adequately illuminated at night.

Significance and observance

National Flag Day is not only a day to honour the flag but also an opportunity to reflect on the values and sacrifices associated with India’s freedom struggle. Schools, government institutions and various organizations often hold ceremonies to pay tribute to the national symbol and educate citizens about its importance.

India’s National Flag Day reminds every Indian of their collective identity and the ideals that the flag embodies. It serves as a powerful symbol of the country’s rich heritage and ongoing journey towards progress and unity.